Climbing Rose

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Paul G of RH
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Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 9:34 pm
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city_state: South Richmond Hill_N.Y.

Climbing Rose

Post by Paul G of RH » Thu Apr 12, 2012 10:01 pm

Last year I had a climbing rose come up in an unusual area. Actually it sprang up where a large pink rose bush with very large pink roses use to be . It sent up about five very, very long shoots about six feet tall. The small red roses were quite pretty but it is growing in an area that is really not suitable for long and leggy. In the fall I cut the entire plant down to about seven inches. This spring it has come back with many more side shoots and looks great! I would like to know if a Climbing Rose can be trained into being a Bush and still give me those beautiful small ( inch and a half) dark red roses. I would like the bush to be no more than two to three Ft. Tall. .......... Thank You all for any input to this question.

gerrycoggin
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2008 2:03 pm

Re: Climbing Rose

Post by gerrycoggin » Wed Apr 18, 2012 5:41 pm

Probably what you have is actually suckering from the root stock of the rose that was planted there originally. Most roses produced now are not on their own root but are grafted. You can cut the shoots back to create more of a bush but you will lose a lot of the bloom.

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