Hydrangia and woody plants transplant

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bpyler
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Hydrangia and woody plants transplant

Post by bpyler » Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:35 pm

:? Is October a safe month to transplant woody type plants? I had a landscaper come to give me some design ideas and he suggested to move a number of boxwoods, holly, azalia's and a hydrangia into different setting arrangements. Most all of these have been in the ground from 4-6 years. But the hydrangia gave beautiful flowers this past Summer and I don't want to ruin it. Morristown, NJ. Thanks!

lorijones
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Re: Hydrangia and woody plants transplant

Post by lorijones » Thu Oct 06, 2011 1:44 pm

It is better to move these woody shrubs while they are dormant which would be later in the fall - late winter as long as the ground is not wet or frozen. Late October or November would be better than now. The hydrangea can be moved in the fall after most of the leaves have fallen off showing that they are entering the dormant period. If you don't have to move the holly in the fall, it might be a good idea to root prune it with a spade now (the diameter of the cut (which will become the diameter of the root ball that you dig in the spring) should be about 6" for every 12" of spread) and then dig it and move it in the spring. This will allow it to establish new feeder roots during the fall and winter which will help it establish better the following season. Here are some tips for moving shrubs: http://www.inthegardenradio.com/v.php?pg=688. Remember, dig as large a root ball as you can handle and prepare the new planting hole well. This will increase the chances of success.

Zagreb4142
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Re: Hydrangia and woody plants transplant

Post by Zagreb4142 » Mon Oct 15, 2012 3:21 pm

I have a beautiful hydrangia growing in the large ceramic planter.
I was planning to put the planter into a styrofoam box and protect it from freezing with sawdust or newspaper and place in the sunny part of the garden. Do I need to protect the branches also since they would be normally exposed during the winter. Can I possibly place the pot in the garage since I have had pretty good success in doing this with my geraniums. If not should I just plant it in the garden ???
Thanks in advance.

lorijones
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Re: Hydrangia and woody plants transplant

Post by lorijones » Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:09 pm

What you do sort of depends on the type of hydrangea you have and what your future plans for this plant are. Do you know what type of hydrangea it is? Here is some information on the different types of hydrangea: http://www.inthegardenradio.com/v.php?pg=664.
Are you hoping to keep it in the pot for a few years or, if it is a hardy variety, are you eventually going to plant it out in the garden?
If you are planing to plant it out in the garden eventually, I would do that this fall rather than risk trying to overwinter it in the container.
If you plan on keeping it in the container for a time, it might be a good idea to move the pot to a protected area near the house if you can or you can move it into the garage for the winter as long as it isn't too warm in there. They do need a cold period over the winter. The above ground portions might need to be protected from severe cold temperatures if it is one of the less "bloom hardy" varieties that blooms on old wood. Tips on protecting these more tender hydrangeas can be found at the link above.

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